Hatf 3 “Ghaznavi”

The Hatf 3 “Ghaznavi” is a short-range, road-mobile, solid-fueled ballistic missile. The system, along with the Hatf 4, appears to be similar to one of the Chinese DF-11 variants.1

Hatf 3 “Ghaznavi” at a Glance

Originated From: Pakistan
Possessed By: Pakistan
Class: Short-Range Ballistic Missile (SRBM)
Basing: Road-mobile
Length: 8.5 m
Diameter: 0.8 m
Launch Weight: 4,650 kg
Payload: Single warhead, 700 kg
Warhead: HE, submunitions, 12-20 kT nuclear
Propulsion: Single-stage solid propellant
Range: 290 km
Status: Operational
In Service: 2004

Hatf 3
Like the DF-11, the Hatf-3 appears to be an improved ‘Scud’ type ballistic missile. Its greatest military utility is in deployment against large, fixed targets such as military bases, airfields, and poses a threat to civilians urban areas.

The Hatf 3 is around be 8.5 m in length, 0.8 m in diameter, and 4,650 kg in launch weight. It can carry a single warhead up to 700 kg a maximum of 290 km. The warhead can be conventional, high explosive (HE), nuclear 12 to 20 kT, or submunitions. Its inertial guidance system provides an accuracy of 250 m CEP. If equipped with terminal guidance, however, its accuracy could improve to 50 m CEP. It uses a single-stage solid propellant engine.2

The development of the Hatf 3 originally started in 1987, but was terminated seven years later with the purchase of a number of PRC DF-11 missiles in 1994.3 The development program was restarted in 1997 to augment Pakistan’s limited number of DF-11 missiles, or possible to disguise further purchases as domestic production. The first flight test of the Hatf-3 occurred in May 2002, and became operational in 2004.4 Subsequent flight tests took place in June and December of 2006, February 2008, and May 2010.

Production of the Hatf 3 was terminated in April 2007, with between 30 and 50 missiles in service as of 2007.5

Sources

  1. Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 62.
  2. “Hatf 3 (Ghaznavi), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 72-73.
  3. Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 62; “Hatf 3 (Ghaznavi), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 72-73.
  4. Jonathan McLaughlin, “Pakistani Missile Update,” Wisconsin Project on Nuclear Arms Control, February 2016, http://www.wisconsinproject.org/countries/pakistan/PakistanMissileUpdate-2016.html.
  5. “Hatf 3 (Ghaznavi), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 72-73.
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