Hatf 5

The Hatf 5 “Ghauri” is a medium-range, road-mobile, liquid-fueled ballistic missile deployed by Pakistan. It can carry 700-kilogram warhead up to 1,500 kilometers. Hatf 5’s range and nuclear capability give it the ability to hold targets deep within Indian territory at risk , making it a core part of Pakistan’s strategic missile forces.

Hatf 5 “Ghauri” at a Glance

Originated From: North Korea / Pakistan
Possessed By: Pakistan
Class: Medium-Range Ballistic Missile (MRBM)
Basing: Road-mobile
Length: 15.9 m
Diameter: 1.35 m
Launch Weight: 15,850 kg
Payload: Single warhead, 700 kg +
Warhead: 12-35 kT nuclear, HE, submunitions, chemical
Propulsion: Single-stage liquid propellant
Range: 1,250-1,500 km
Status: Operational
In Service: 2003

Hatf 5

The Hatf 5 missile has an estimated range of between 1,250-1,500 km.1 It is 15.9 m in length, 1.35 m in diameter, with a launch weight of 15,850 kg. Its payload is a single separating warhead weighing up to 1,200 kg. The warhead can carry a 700 kg 12 to 35 kT yield nuclear weapon, chemical, HE, or submunitions. A heavier payload could likely be accomodated, but its range would likely decrease. The reported accuracy of the Hatf 5 is 2,500 m, however, it is possible that with an advanced Chinese guidance system, the CEP could be more accurate than reported. The missile uses a single-stage liquid propellant engine.

The Ghauri uses a single-stage liquid propellant engine. Liquid fuel can significantly increase launch preparation time, and can complicate storage and transportation.2 Like most Pakistani missile systems, the Hatf 5 is designed for launch from modified Russian ‘Scud-B’ Transporter-Erector-Launcher (TEL) vehicles. A modified battle tank is also known to have been used for a TEL vehicle.3 The mobility provided by these vehicles help make the missiles more difficult for enemy forces to locate and target.

The Ghauri is nearly identical in appearance to the North Korea’s No Dong 1 MRBM.4 Cooperation between the two countries is documented throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s. Both North Korea and Pakistan exchanged delegations on several occasions during these years and reportedly discussed missile development.  Pakistan received between 12-25 No Dong missiles from North Korea as a result of the cooperation.5 It also appears that the Hatf 5 was developed in conjunction with Iran, as the Iranian Shahab-3 missile appears very similar both in appearance and capabilities, and there is evidence all three countries have cooperated on these missile programs together since the 1980s.6 China may have provided additional support in the Hatf 5 development process, as it is believed that the Hatf-5’s guidance system is of Chinese origin.7

The first flight test of the Hatf 5 occurred in 1998, and entered service in 2003.8

Hatf 5A (Ghauri 2) 

The Ghauri 2 is a medium-range, road-mobile, liquid propellant ballistic missile currently under development. It is a longer ranged variant of the Hatf 5, developed by replacing the heavier steel construction with an aluminum alloy and using improved propellants. It is expected to have a range of at least 1,800 km.9

Sources

  1. National Air and Space Intelligence Center, U.S. Air Force, “Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threat,” 2013, http://fas.org/programs/ssp/nukes/nuclearweapons/NASIC2013_050813.pdf; report; Sharon A. Squassoni, “Weapons of Mass Destruction: Trade Between North Korea and Pakistan,” Congressional Research Service, RL31900, November 28, 2006, http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/crs/rl31900.pdf.
  2. “Hatf 5 (Ghauri), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 74-76; Sharon A. Squassoni, “Weapons of Mass Destruction: Trade Between North Korea and Pakistan,” Congressional Research Service, RL31900, November 28, 2006, http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/crs/rl31900.pdf.
  3. “Hatf 5 (Ghauri), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 74-76.
  4. Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 65
  5. Sharon A. Squassoni, “Weapons of Mass Destruction: Trade Between North Korea and Pakistan,” Congressional Research Service, RL31900, November 28, 2006, http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/crs/rl31900.pdf
  6. Sharon A. Squassoni, “Weapons of Mass Destruction: Trade Between North Korea and Pakistan,” Congressional Research Service, RL31900, November 28, 2006, http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/crs/rl31900.pdf; “Hatf 5 (Ghauri), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 74-76.
  7. T.V. Paul, “Chinese-Pakistani Nuclear/Missile Ties and the Balance of Power,” The Nonproliferation Review, Summer 2003, https://www.nonproliferation.org/wp-content/uploads/npr/102paul.pdf ; “Hatf 5 (Ghauri), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 74-76.
  8. Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 61; Sharon A. Squassoni, “Weapons of Mass Destruction: Trade Between North Korea and Pakistan,” Congressional Research Service, RL31900, November 28, 2006, http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/crs/rl31900.pdf.
  9. Sharon A. Squassoni, “Weapons of Mass Destruction: Trade Between North Korea and Pakistan,” Congressional Research Service, RL31900, November 28, 2006, http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/crs/rl31900.pdf; “Hatf 5 (Ghauri), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 74-76.
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