Missile Defense and Defeat: Appendices


Note: This appears as Appendix A and Appendix B in Missile Defense and Defeat: Consideration for the New Policy Review

Appendix A: FY 2017 NDAA Requirement for a Review of U.S. Missile Defeat Policy and Strategy

SEC. 1684. REVIEW OF THE MISSILE DEFEAT POLICY AND STRATEGY OF THE UNITED STATES.1

(a) REVIEW REQUIRED.—The Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff shall jointly conduct a new review of the missile defeat capability, policy, and strategy of the United States, with respect to—

(1) left- and right-of-launch ballistic missile defense for—

(A) both regional and homeland purposes; and

(B) the full range of active, passive, kinetic, and nonkinetic defense measures across the full spectrum of land-, air-, sea-, and space-based platforms;

(2) the integration of offensive and defensive forces for the defeat of ballistic missiles, including against weapons initially deployed on ballistic missiles, such as hypersonic glide vehicles; and

(3) cruise missile defense of the homeland.

(b) ELEMENTS—The review under subsection (a) shall address the following:

(1) The missile defeat policy, strategy, and objectives of the United States in relation to the national security strategy of the United States and the military strategy of the United States.

(2) The role of deterrence in the missile defeat policy and strategy of the United States.

(3) The missile defeat posture, capability, and force structure of the United States.

(4) With respect to both the five- and ten-year periods beginning on the date of the review, the planned and desired end-state of the missile defeat programs of the United States, including regarding the integration and interoperability of such programs with the joint forces and the integration and interoperability of such programs with allies, and specific benchmarks, milestones, and key steps required to reach such end-states.

(5) The process for determining requirements, force structure, and inventory objectives for missile defeat capabilities under such programs, including input from the joint military requirements process.

(6) The organization, execution, and oversight of acquisition for the missile defeat programs of the United States.

(7) The roles and responsibilities of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Defense Agencies, combatant commands, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the military departments, and the intelligence community in such programs and the process for ensuring accountability of each stakeholder.

(8) Standards for the military utility, operational effectiveness, suitability, and survivability of the missile defeat systems of the United States.

(9) The method in which resources for the missile defeat mission are planned, programmed, and budgeted within the Department of Defense.

(10) The near-term and long-term costs and cost effectiveness of such programs.

(11) The options for affecting the offense-defense cost curve.

(12) The role of international cooperation in the missile defeat policy and strategy of the United States and the plans, policies, and requirements for integration and interoperability of missile defeat capability with allies.

(13) Options for increasing the frequency of the codevelopment of missile defeat capabilities with allies of the United States in the near-term and far-term.

(14) Declaratory policy governing the employment of missile defeat capabilities and the military options and plans and employment options of such capabilities.

(15) The role of multi-mission defense and other assets of the United States, including space and terrestrial sensors and plans to achieve multi-mission capability in current, planned, and other future assets and acquisition programs.

(16) The indications and warning required to meet the missile defeat strategy and objectives of the United States described in paragraph (1) and the key enablers and programs to achieve such indications and warning.

(17) The impact of the mobility, countermeasures, and denial and deception capabilities of adversaries on the indications and warning described in paragraph (16) and the consequences on the missile defeat capability, objectives, and military options of the United States and the plans of the combatant commanders.

(18) Any other matters the Secretary determines relevant.

(c) REPORTS.—

(1) RESULTS.—Not later than January 31, 2018, the Secretary shall submit to the congressional defense committees a report setting forth the results of the review under subsection (a).

(2) FORM.—The report required by paragraph (1) shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

(3) ANNUAL IMPLEMENTATION UPDATES.—During the five year period beginning on the date of the submission of the report under paragraph (1), the Director of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation shall submit to the Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the congressional defense committees annual status updates detailing the progress of the Secretary in implementing the missile defeat strategy of the United States.

(4) THREAT REPORT.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Director of National Intelligence shall submit to the congressional defense committees, the
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives, and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate a report containing an unclassified summary, consistent with the protection of intelligence sources and methods, of—

(A) as of the date of the report required by this paragraph, the ballistic and cruise missile threat to the United States, deployed forces of the United States, and friends and allies of the United States from short-, medium-, intermediate-, and long-range nuclear and non-nuclear ballistic and cruise missile threats; and

(B) an assessment of such threat in 2026.

(5) DECLARATORY POLICY, CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS, AND EMPLOYMENT GUIDELINES FOR LEFT-OF-LAUNCH CAPABILITY.— Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff shall jointly submit to the congressional defense committees the following:

(A) The unclassified declaratory policy of the United States regarding the use of the left-of-launch capability of the United States against potential targets.

(B) Both the classified and unclassified concept of operations for the use of such capability across and between the combatant commands.

(C) Both the classified and unclassified employment strategy, plans, and options for such capability.

(d) NOTIFICATION.—

(1) LIMITATION.—None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act or otherwise made available for fiscal year 2017 or fiscal year 2018 for the Secretary of Defense may be obligated or expended to change the non-standard acquisition processes and responsibilities described in paragraph (2) until—

(A) the Secretary notifies the congressional defense committees of such proposed change; and

(B) a period of 180 days has elapsed following the date of such notification.

(2) NON-STANDARD ACQUISITION PROCESSES AND RESPONSIBILITIES DESCRIBED.—The non-standard acquisition processes and responsibilities described in this paragraph are such processes and responsibilities described in—

(A) the memorandum of the Secretary of Defense titled ‘‘Missile Defense
Program Direction’’ signed on January 2, 2002; and

(B) Department of Defense Directive 5134.09, as in effect on the date of the enactment of this Act.

(e) DESIGNATION REQUIRED.—

(1) AUTHORITY.—Not later than March 31, 2018, the Secretary of Defense shall designate a military department or Defense Agency with acquisition authority with respect to—

(A) the capability to defend the homeland from cruise missiles; and

(B) left-of-launch ballistic missile defeat capability.

(2) DISCRETION.—The Secretary may designate a single military department or Defense Agency with the acquisition authority described in paragraph (1) or designate a separate military department or Defense Agency for each function specified in such paragraph.

(3) VALIDATION.—In making a designation under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall include a description of the manner in which the military requirements for such capabilities will be validated.

(f) DEFINITIONS.—In this section:

(1) The term ‘‘Defense Agency’’ has the meaning given that term in section 101(a)(11) of title 10, United States Code.

(2) The term ‘‘intelligence community’’ has the meaning given that term in section 3 of the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 3003).

Appendix B: FY 2009 NDAA Requirement for a Review of U.S. Ballistic Missile Defense Policy and Strategy

SEC. 234. REVIEW OF THE BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE POLICY AND STRATEGY OF THE UNITED STATES.2

(a) REVIEW REQUIRED.—The Secretary of Defense shall conduct a review of the ballistic missile defense policy and strategy of the United States.

(b) ELEMENTS—The matters addressed by the review required by subsection (a) shall include the following:

(1) The ballistic missile defense policy of the United States in relation to the overall national security policy of the United States.

(2) The ballistic missile defense strategy and objectives of the United States in relation to the national security strategy of the United States and the military strategy of the United States.

(3) The ballistic missile threat to the United States, deployed forces of the United States, and friends and allies of the United States from short, medium, intermediate, and long-range ballistic missile threats.

(4) The organization, discharge, and oversight of acquisition for the ballistic missile defense programs of the United States.

(5) The roles and responsibilities of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, defense agencies, combatant commands, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the military departments in such programs.

(6) The process for determining requirements for missile defense capabilities under such programs, including input from the joint military requirements process.

(7) The process for determining the force structure and inventory objectives for such programs.

(8) Standards for the military utility, operational effectiveness, suitability, and survivability of the ballistic missile defense systems of the United States.

(9) The method in which resources for the ballistic missile defense mission are planned, programmed, and budgeted within the Department of Defense.

(10) The near-term and long-term affordability and cost effectiveness of such programs.

(11) The objectives, requirements, and standards for test and evaluation with respect to such programs.

(12) Accountability, transparency, and oversight with respect to such programs.

(13) The role of international cooperation on missile defense in the ballistic missile defense policy and strategy of the United States.

(14) Any other matters the Secretary determines relevant.

(c) REPORT.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than January 31, 2010, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report setting forth the results of the review required by subsection (a).

(2) FORM.—The report required by this subsection shall be in unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

Sources

  1. National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, Conference Report to Accompany S.2943, Sec.1684, 114th Congress (2016): 629-632.
  2. Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009, Pub. L. No. 110-417, Sec. 234, 122 Stat. 4393-4394 (October 14, 2008).
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