Houthis Fire 7 Ballistic Missiles into Saudi Arabia

On March 25, Houthi militants fired seven ballistic missiles into Saudi Arabia. Reports indicate that three missiles targeted Riyadh, two aimed at Jizan, and one each targeted Khamis Mushait and Najran. Houthi media confirmed these launches, identifying at least one of the missiles fired as the Burkan-H2 and asserting that airports were the primary target. According to KSA press reports, Saudi air defense forces “intercepted and destroyed” all seven missiles, although this claim cannot be independently confirmed. At least one Patriot interceptor failed after launch and crashed in the Al-Malqa neighborhood in Riyadh. Another appears to have detonated shortly after being launched. One Egyptian resident in Riyadh was killed by shrapnel, and at least two others were injured.

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Video 1 – crowd gathers around what appears to be a Houthi ballistic missile fuselage, lying on a street in Riyadh. It was likely intercepted by a PAC-2, as evidenced by the smoking hole on the missile’s right side.
Video 2 – shows what appears to be a failing Patriot interceptor, turning sharply leftward and falling to ground in Riyadh’s Al-Malqa neighborhood.
Video 3 – shows three Patriot interceptors, two in flight and the remains of another. The two in flight appear to have conducted successful intercepts, while the earlier missile appears to have detonated prematurely, resulting in large, flaming debris.
Video 4 – shows two Patriot interceptors in flight, with the second appearing to fail, turning sharply leftward and falling to ground. Based on its trajectory, this interceptor is likely the same shown in video #2.
Video 5 – shows two Patriot interceptors in flight, with the second appearing to fail. It is unclear if this interceptor is the same shown in videos #2 and #4. Another video appears to show this interceptor in close proximity to explosion.
Video 6 – shows two Patriot interceptors in flight, with the second appearing to fail, turning sharply leftward and striking ground near a residential area. It appears to be the same shown in videos #2 and #4.

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