FY 2019 Missile Defense Agency Budget Tracker

FY 2019 Missile Defense Agency Budget Tracker

On August 1, Congress passed the FY 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). The bill authorizes a total of $10 billion for the Missile Defense Agency, $51 million more than…

The Forthcoming Missile Defense Review

The Forthcoming Missile Defense Review

Later this spring, the Trump administration will release its 2018 Missile Defense Review (MDR), which is expected to better align U.S. missile defense policy with the present security environment. President…

Trump’s 2019 Missile Defense Budget: Choosing Capacity over Capability

Trump’s 2019 Missile Defense Budget: Choosing Capacity over Capability

The administration’s budget request for FY 2019 prioritizes near-term readiness against limited but growing ballistic missile threats from sources such as North Korea. This choice, however, falls short of connecting missile defense efforts to the reality of renewed great power competition as articulated in the National Defense Strategy.

How to Keep US Missile Defense on the Right Track

How to Keep US Missile Defense on the Right Track

Recent budget moves will give the U.S. missile defense effort a major boost in funding over the coming year, likely allowing the purchase of additional Ground Based Interceptor missiles on top of the 44 already deployed for use by the Ground-based Midcourse Defense system against ICBMs headed toward the U.S. homeland.

Distributed Defense: New Operational Concepts for Air and Missile Defense

Distributed Defense: New Operational Concepts for Air and Missile Defense

Despite the rising salience of missile threats, current air and missile defense forces are far too susceptible to suppression. Today’s U.S. air and missile defense (AMD) force lacks the depth, capacity, and operational flexibility to simultaneously perform both missions

Here’s How the US Army Should Arm Itself for New Threats

Here’s How the US Army Should Arm Itself for New Threats

The U.S. Army has been at war continuously for 16 years. New technologies pose new threats and old technologies grow in numbers and capability. If ever the Army were ever to think creatively about how to meet the extraordinary demands it faces, now would be the time.

Why America Must Improve Its Missile Defense Systems

Why America Must Improve Its Missile Defense Systems

President Trump’s recent claim that U.S. ballistic-missile defenses are effective “97 percent of the time” has provoked much discussion about the capabilities of one U.S. defense system in particular: Ground-Based Midcourse Defense.

A Missile Defense Agenda

A Missile Defense Agenda

In the 1990s, the U.S. intelligence community assessed that North Korea might acquire an intercontinental ballistic missile by 2015. That threat is now here.