Hatf 4 “Shaheen 1”

The Hatf 4 “Shaheen 1” is a short-range, road-mobile, solid-fueled ballistic missile. It appears to be a scaled up version of Chinese DF-11 missile.1

Hatf 4 “Shaheen 1” at a Glance

Originated From: China/Pakistan
Possessed By: Pakistan
Class: Short-Range Ballistic Missile (SRBM)
Basing: Road-mobile
Length: 12.0 m
Diameter: 1.0 m
Launch Weight: 9,500 kg
Payload: Single warhead, 700 kg
Warhead: 35 kT nuclear, HE, submunitions, chemical
Propulsion: Single-stage solid propellant
Range: 750 km
Status: Operational
In Service: 2003

shaheen 1

The DF-11 is an improved Scud design, of which Pakistan has imported 34 according to reports, and then likely reverse engineered to develop the Hatf 4.2 Like the DF-11, the Hatf-4 is launched from a modified Russian ‘Scud-B’ Transporter-Erector-Launcher (TEL).

The Hatf 4 has a range of 750 km when carrying its standard payload and an accuracy of 200 m CEP.3 Its accuracy is provided by an inertial guidance system, and utilizes a “post separation attitude correction system” which helps increase its accuracy and may give it rudimentary ability to evade missile defense systems.4 It uses a single-stage, solid propellant engine and can carry a single high-explosive, chemical, or 35 kt nuclear warhead payload weighing up to 1,000 kg. The missile measures 12.0 m in length, 1.0 m in diameter, and has a launch weight of 9,500 kg.5

Development of the Hatf 4 is believed to have started in 1993, and the missile was first displayed in March 1999. The first flight test publicly acknowledged by Pakistan took place in April 1999, though flight tests may have begun as early as July 1997.6 Subsequent tests took place in October 2002, October 2003, December 2004, November 2006, January 2008, and May 2010. The missile system was put into service by the Pakistan Army Strategic Force Command in March 2003.

Shaheen-1A

There is reportedly an extended range version of the Hatf 4, termed the Shaheen 1A, undergoing testing. This variant is expected to have a range of 900 km, and has been tested at least twice, in April 2012 and December 2015.7

Sources

  1. T.V. Paul, “Chinese-Pakistani Nuclear/Missile Ties and the Balance of Power,” The Nonproliferation Review, Summer 2003, https://www.nonproliferation.org/wp-content/uploads/npr/102paul.pdf
  2. “Hatf 4 (Shaheen 1), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 73; Richard Fisher Jr., “Pakistan’s Long Range Ballistic Missiles: A View From IDEAS,” International Assessment and Strategy Center, November 1, 2004, http://www.strategycenter.net/research/pubid.47/pub_detail.asp; Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 63.
  3. Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 63; “Hatf 4 (Shaheen 1), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 73.
  4. Richard Fisher Jr., “Pakistan’s Long Range Ballistic Missiles: A View From IDEAS,” International Assessment and Strategy Center, November 1, 2004, http://www.strategycenter.net/research/pubid.47/pub_detail.asp.
  5. “Hatf 4 (Shaheen 1), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 74.
  6. “Pakistan,” Nuclear Threat Initiative, April 2016, http://www.nti.org/learn/countries/pakistan/delivery-systems/; “Hatf 4 (Shaheen 1), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 74.
  7. Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 63; Paul K. Kerr and Mary Beth Nikitin, “Pakistan’s Nuclear Weapons: Proliferation and Security Issues,” Congressional Research Service, RL34248, May 10, 2012, http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/nukevault/ebb388/docs/EBB035.pdf; “Pakistan,” Nuclear Threat Initiative, April 2016, http://www.nti.org/learn/countries/pakistan/delivery-systems/