Hatf 7 “Babur”

The Hatf 7 “Babur” is a short-range, turbojet-powered ground-launch cruise missile. Development  of missile started in the 1990s as a response to the Indian cruise missile program,  and may have been aided by the reverse engineering of one or more U.S. RGM/UGM-109 Tomahawk missiles recovered by Pakistan in May 1998. The missile also shares similar characteristics to the Russian AS-15, the Russian SS-N-27 Club, and Chinese Hong Niao-3.1

Hatf 7 “Babur” at a Glance

Originated from: Pakistan
Possessed by: Pakistan
Class: Subsonic Cruise Missile
Basing: Ground launched
Length: 6.2 m
Diameter: 0.52 m
Launch weight: 1,500 kg
Payload: Single warhead, 450-500 kg, nuclear capable
Warhead: 10-35 kT nuclear, HE, submunitions
Propulsion: Turbojet
Range: 350-700 km
Status: Operational
In service: 2010-present

hatf 7

The Hatf 7 is estimated to have a length of 6.2 m, a diameter of 0.52 m, and fold-out wings with a 2.5 m wingspan. With a launch weight around 1,500 kg, it is capable of carrying a 450 kg payload up to 700 km.  The missile can be equipped with either a single 10 or 35 kT nuclear warhead, or up to 450 kg worth of conventional explosives (HE unitary or submunitions).2

Over the course of the missile’s lifespan, there have been a wide range of estimates and declarations as to its range. When the missile was first tested in 2005, it was announced that it had a range of 500 km. In 2012, there were claims of the Babur reaching a 700 km range. Future improvements could extend the missile’s range to around 1000 km.3 However, U.S. assessments put the current range much lower at 350 km.4

The missile began testing in August 2005. Subsequently, at least ten flight tests have occurred through July 2014. The system is believed to have entered service in 2010. The known launch vehicles have all been mobile, land-based platforms. It is possible that air, ship, and even submarine-launch versions could be developed in the future.5

    1. “Hatf 7 (Babur), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 172; Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 64.
    2. “Hatf 7 (Babur), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 172
    3. “Hatf 7 (Babur), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 172; Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 64.
    4. National Air and Space Intelligence Center, U.S. Air Force, “Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threat,” 2013, http://fas.org/programs/ssp/nukes/nuclearweapons/NASIC2013_050813.pdf.
    5. “Hatf 9 (Babur), in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 172.