Hatf 6 “Shaheen 2”

The Hatf 6 “Shaheen 2” is a medium-range, road-mobile, solid-fueled ballistic missile. It appears to be a two-stage version of the Hatf 4 (Shaheen 1) design, using a modified Hatf 4 as the second stage motor and RV. It is believed that the Hatf 6 is based on the People’s Republic of China (PRC) M-18, though this has not been confirmed.1

Shaheen 2 At a Glance

Originated From: Pakistan
Possessed By: Pakistan
Class: Medium-Range Ballistic Missile (MRBM)
Basing: Road-mobile
Length: 17.2 m
Diameter: 1.4 m
Launch Weight: 23,600 kg
Payload: Single warhead, 700 kg
Warhead: 15-35 kT nuclear, HE, submunitions, chemical
Propulsion: Two-stage solid propellant
Range: 1,500-2,000 km
Status: Operational
In Service: 2014

Hatf 6 Shaheen 2

The Shaheen 2 has a reported range of between 1,500-2,000 km.2 It is 17.2 m in length, 1.4 m in diameter, and has a launch weight of 23,600 kg. The RV has four small motors to improve accuracy, an approximately 350 m CEP, and maneuverability upon re-entry. It is designed to carry a single warhead payload weighing 700 kg, though reports suggest that payloads up to 1,230 kg have been developed. Increasing the payload weight, however, may shorten the missile’s range. The Hatf 6 warhead can be equipped for a nuclear yield between 15 and 35 kT. There are also provisions to deploy the missile with conventional high explosives (HE), submunitions, fuel-air explosives (FAE), or chemical agents. It is launched from a transporter-erector-launcher (TEL), that is similar to the Russian MAZ-547V which was used to launch the Russian’s SS-20 Saber.3

The Shaheen 2 was first displayed in March 2000 and first tested in March 2004. Several subsequent tests have taken place, with a final “training launch” occurring in November 2014, after which the missile became operational.4

Sources

  1. “Hatf 6 (Shaheen 2),” in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 76.
  2. Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 61; Paul K. Kerr and Mary Beth Nikitin, “Pakistan’s Nuclear Weapons: Proliferation and Security Issues,” Congressional Research Service, RL34248, May 10, 2012, http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/nukevault/ebb388/docs/EBB035.pdf.
  3. “Hatf 6 (Shaheen 2),” in IHS Jane’s Weapons: Strategic 2015-2016, ed. James C. O’Halloran (United Kingdom: IHS, 2015), 77.
  4. Hans M. Kristensen & Robert S. Norris, Pakistani nuclear forces, 2015, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 71:6, 63.